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News Feature

Deer Isle
Originally published in Island Ad-Vantages, July 3, 2013
Garden tour highlights Little Deer Isle properties, working farm

A brook runs through McWilliams' garden

The brook at the McWilliams property, which runs under the house and down to the ocean.

by Kirsten Reed

The Evergreen Garden Club hosted its annual Island Garden Tour on a misty Saturday, June 29. The tour consisted of four properties right on the water in Little Deer Isle, and one working farm on Deer Isle.

The first, owned by Jimmy McWilliams, showcases decades-worth of gardening, and made use of a brook, fashioned into a canal by granite blocks on either side. The brook was there before the house, which was erected directly over it, like a bridge.

Bob and Macy Lasky’s place features a modern house perched over Penobscot Bay with a garden full of metal artworks and easy-care native and hardy plantings.

The gardens of Ann Lauphenheimer and Marc Sonnenfeld are tucked down a half-mile driveway, surrounding a cozy wooden kit home. It consists mostly of perennial flowers, and slopes down to a wooden dock.

Deb Marshall and Kim Petty built their house right on Eggemoggin Reach. They raise chickens, and make use of solar and wind power. The gardens house many of Petty’s sculptures.

The tour ended at Yellow Birch Farm, owned and operated by blacksmith Eric Ziner and potter Melissa Greene. The farm is home to pigs, goats and chickens, both artists’ studios, and extensive vegetable gardens. Melissa milks the goats and runs a goat cheese business from the premises.

Piglets at Yellow Birch Farm

A pair of curious piglets greets tour-goers at Yellow Birch Farm.

Photo by Kirsten Reed
A brook runs through McWilliams' garden

The brook at the McWilliams property, which runs under the house and down to the ocean.

Eric Ziner in the Garden Tour

Eric Ziner demonstrates a contraption of his design, used to poke holes in the sheets of plastic that cover rows of seedlings in the vegetable garden.

Photo by Kirsten Reed